/ February 25, 2014

Episode 20:

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I’m all alone in the office tonight. Why not subscribe to the podcast and rate us five stars on iTunes to cure my loneliness?

1. Lawyers have one of the highest suicide rates in America and with stories like this I’m not convinced that’s changing anytime soon. The ABA Journal reports Ira Bordow was working with firm Styles & Pumpian on a fee-split arrangement when took his life. Bordow’s brother found a check from an insurance company made out to both his brother Ira, and Styles & Pumpian. Ira’s brother did the right thing and forwarded the check along to the firm, which presumably should have deposited it, calculated the agreed-upon fee split, and sent a check to Ira’s estate.

Instead, Styles & Pumpian decided to keep the money and make the following statement.

Ira terminated his relationship with us regarding this action without notice and without cause.

Even assuming arguendo that’s a valid application of the governing law, I don’t know that a firm can recover from that kind of faux pas.

2. The Supreme Court ruled today that any member of a household can consent to a search, even over the objections of another member. The lesson here is choose your roommates carefully. Especially if you’re a gang banger.

3. Our good friends over at Clio today released  their Apple in Law Offices for 2013 report, which surveys primarily small law offices. Interesting results include: 66% of respondents preferred OS X over 33% who were primarily using Windows machines. 74% of law offices were using iPhones as their de facto mobile devices, most of whom said they selected iOS because it was more reliable and more secure.

4. The most popular site for trading Bitcoin disappeared from the Internet the other day. Today, a consortium of Bitcoin vendors issued a joint press release essentially saying “judge the currency, not a website.” I’ll talk a bit more about this in the ‘cast.

5.  The St. Louis Circuit Court is rolling out facial recognition in the courthouse. Don’t worry, the Court vows that it will only input the faces of people who might be a problem, whatever that means. Like the ACLU rep the ABA Journal referenced, I worry about how one defines “a problem.”

Please also take note of our subreddit at reddit.com/r/thelawreview. Feel free to submit stories there or vote on the stories you’d like to hear us discuss that day. You can also email us at podcast /at fastcase /dot com.

Thanks for listening!

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