/ April 29, 2010

Rediscover a National Treasure: The Library of Congress

Rediscover the Library of Congress

At Fastcase, we are big fans of the Library of Congress (and being information nerds, we admit that we are a little biased in this regard).  But even if you are not the type to salivate over well-organized card catalog, we think you will agree that the LOC is a truly amazing public resource, dare we say, public treasure.

While you might be familiar with the grand images of the LOC’s main reading room, we bet you will be pleasantly surprised by the breadth and depth of the LOC’s digital and online resources.  There is so much to read, see, hear, and watch all from the comfort of your own computer screen.  Here just a few of our favorites:

The LOC is archiving Twitter.  We are really excited about this one.  The LOC is partnering with Twitter to digitally archive every public tweet ever tweeted, from the historic to the mundane.

The LOC is already archiving all kinds of web sites.  Among the topics covered are the 2000, 2002, and 2004 elections, September 11th, and the 2005 Papal transition.  To access this collection, click here.

An eye-popping  collection of digital images including WPA Posters from 1936-1946, tons of historical maps and historic newspapers and photographs.  You really have to see this to believe it, so we have selected a few interesting tidbits for your viewing pleasure below.

The LOC has its own Flickr photostream chock full of images from historic newspaper images and photos.  Explore history visually by browsing the LOC’s well curated collection of historical images.  The LOC even encourages visitors to contribute by tagging and commenting images with additional information.

An eye-popping rare book and special collection including priceless items like the Lincoln bible.  You might have known that you can view the book in the LOC’s reading room, but did you know that you can also leaf through 1292 high quality images documenting the book online ?

A vast online database of federal legislative history.  Justice Scalia may not be interested in legislative history, but for those of us who are, there is THOMAS.  Use THOMAS to research nearly any aspect of the legislative process.

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